Israel and the Church

This particular post will contain two links from two different sources. The first link is directly below and I will provide the first paragraph of it directly below the link : https://www.hebrew4christians.com/Articles/Israel/israel.html

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When studying the Jewish roots of Christianity, certain questions often arise regarding the nature of the “Church,” the nature of “Israel,” and the relationship between them. Do Gentile Christians become “Jewish” on account of their relationship to Jesus? Does the “Church” somehow replace the Jewish people in God’s plan as the “new Israel”? Exactly how should we understand the relationship between the Church and Israel today?

In general, Christian theology has developed three different interpretative systems that attempt to answer such questions:

1. Replacement Theology

The Church and Israel refer to the same group of people.

2. Separation Theology

The Church and Israel refer to different groups of people.

3. Remnant Theology

The Church and Israel overlap in some manner.


The first link is a lengthy post but it is very informative and I highly recommend that you read through it’s entirety.

The second link is here: https://redeemedmind.com/2020/09/25/israel-and-salvation-romans-11/ and it deals specifically with chapter 11 of Romans and how it applies to Israel and the Church. 

This is an important subject for all Christians to be aware of because you are going to encounter Christians that hold different perspectives on this subject. I’m not going to tell you which way I lean but the second link is a hint. 

Would love to hear feedback on this if you have the time.

Worthy is the Lamb! Blessings!

18 comments

  1. Thanks for the resources, Bruce. I tend toward “Separation Theology” as the Gospel church I started out at as a new believer taught dispensationalism, but I’m definitely not a dispensationalist zealot. I’ve observed that believers can get into very heated debates over this topic. I grew up as a member of the Catholic church, which definitely taught “Replacement Theology” prior to Vatican II. The Puritans who came to America also taught Replacement Theology, which was the basis of America being touted as the New Israel/New Jerusalem.

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  2. I tend toward dispensationalism. It makes the most sense to me eschatologically. I am a pre-trib. However, I find it very low on the list of things Christians need to agree on. And quite frankly it rarely comes up in Bible studies I have facilitated nor in conversation I have with those who want to know Jesus. 🙂

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